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Rising Voices: Histoire sous-représentée (par Walk With Me Savannah Tours)

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Walk With Me Savannah Tours présente 'Rising Voices', une tournée historique de Savannah mettant exclusivement en vedette des récits et des personnages sous-représentés.

Historiquement, trop de récits ont été minimisés ou simplement exclus des histoires soigneusement élaborées de la société. Faites une visite à pied où nous mettrons plutôt exclusivement en évidence ces voix sous-représentées.

Nous nous concentrerons sur la vie et les réalisations des résidents noirs, autochtones, queer et féminins de Savannah et comment ils ont eu un impact sur le monde qui les entoure, de telle manière une façon dont Savannah telle qu'elle est n'existerait pas sans chacun d'eux.

Les visites commencent à Franklin Square et se terminent à Monterey Square.
Ville: Savane
Mon 26 Feb
i
Vous pouvez déjà choisir la date sur le site de réservation
À partir de $35.00
Mon 26 Feb
À partir de $35.00
Faire une réservation
Ce qui est inclu
Fully narrated interactive tour
Fully narrated interactive tour
Fully narrated interactive tour
Fully narrated interactive tour
Fully narrated interactive tour
Fully narrated interactive tour
Fully narrated interactive tour
Information additionnelle
  • Accessible aux fauteuils roulants
  • Les bébés et les jeunes enfants peuvent monter dans un landau ou une poussette
  • Animaux d'assistance autorisés
  • Des options de transport en commun sont disponibles à proximité
  • Les options de transport sont accessibles aux fauteuils roulants
  • Toutes les zones et surfaces sont accessibles aux fauteuils roulants
  • Convient à tous les niveaux de condition physique
  • Animaux de compagnie bien élevés autorisés
  • Déconseillé aux clients qui ne peuvent pas marcher ou rouler pendant 15 minutes sans s'arrêter
  • Tous les guides touristiques sont entièrement vaccinés (rappel compris).
À quoi s'attendre
1
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
2
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
3
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
4
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
5
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
6
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
7
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
8
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
9
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
10
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
11
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
12
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
13
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
14
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
15
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
16
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
17
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
18
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
19
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
20
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
21
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
22
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
23
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
24
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
25
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
26
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
27
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
28
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
29
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
30
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
31
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
32
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
33
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
34
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
35
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
36
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
37
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
38
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
39
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
40
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
41
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
42
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
43
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
44
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
45
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
46
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
47
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
48
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
49
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
50
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
51
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
52
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
53
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
54
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
55
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
56
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
57
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
58
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
59
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
60
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
61
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
62
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
63
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
64
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
65
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
66
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
67
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
68
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
69
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
70
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
71
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
72
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
73
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
74
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
75
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
76
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
77
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
78
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
79
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
80
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
81
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
82
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
83
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
84
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
85
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
86
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
87
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
88
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
89
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
90
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
91
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
92
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
93
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
94
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
95
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
96
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
97
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
98
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
99
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
100
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
101
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
102
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
103
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
104
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
105
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
106
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
107
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
108
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
109
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
110
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
111
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
112
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
113
Franklin Square
In Franklin Square we will discuss how Haiti volunteered during the American Revolution, clandestine schools that operated in Savannah that taught literacy to black students while such an education was outlawed, the First African Baptist Church which houses the oldest African Baptist congregation in the country, and its role in the Underground Railroad.
114
City Market
Passing through City Market, we will see Club One, the home performance venue of Lady Chablis, a Savannah LGBTQ icon. We will also see the building that was home to one of the most active markets for the selling of humans as property, which was immediately converted into a freedman's school after emancipation by some of the very people who were sold as property inside.
115
Telfair Academy
We will stop in front of Telfair Academy and discuss Mary Telfair, a woman who defied the expectations placed on her by gender roles at the time and began the legacy of preservation in Savannah.
116
Wright Square
Here we will discuss the impacts of two key native figures in Savannah history: Tomochichi, chief and founder of the native Yamacraw tribe, and Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove) a Creek woman. Both were as instrumental in the shaping of Savannah as Oglethorpe who is considered the founder.
117
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace
Here we will discuss Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the girl Scouts, as well as other unconventional female family members, and how they impacted the roles women would play in the future, and will also touch on Julliette's hearing loss.
118
Chippewa Square
Here we will briefly discuss the original site of the Savannah Catholic Church, founded by the Haitian community discussed earlier. We we also discuss Susie King Taylor, a self-freed woman who served as a nurse and teacher during the Civil War, published a memoir, and opened a school for black children just off of Chippewa Square.
119
Madison Square
Here we will stop in front of the Green-Meldrim house and discuss Field Order 15, as issued by General Sherman but formed and negotiated by a group of 20 black pastors and community leaders led by Garrison Frazier, how it was the birth of practical reparation efforts, and why it implementation was prevented.
120
Monterey Square
Here we will discuss Jim Williams, famous from Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, but a prominent Savannah gay man who also began Savannah's entire restoration movement. We will also see the monument of Count Casimir Pulaski, and discuss his impact on the Revolution and the recent discovery that he was likely an intersex person.
121
Place Franklin
À Franklin Square, nous discuterons de la façon dont Haïti s'est porté volontaire pendant la Révolution américaine, des écoles clandestines qui fonctionnaient à Savannah qui enseignaient l'alphabétisation aux étudiants noirs alors qu'une telle éducation était interdite, la première église baptiste africaine qui abrite la plus ancienne congrégation baptiste africaine du pays, et son rôle dans le chemin de fer clandestin.
122
Marché de la ville
En passant par City Market, nous verrons le Club One, la salle de spectacle à domicile de Lady Chablis, une icône LGBTQ de Savannah. Nous verrons également le bâtiment qui abritait l'un des marchés les plus actifs pour la vente d'humains comme propriété, qui a été immédiatement converti en école d'affranchis après l'émancipation par certaines des personnes mêmes qui ont été vendues comme propriété à l'intérieur.
123
Académie Telfair
Nous nous arrêterons devant la Telfair Academy et discuterons de Mary Telfair, une femme qui a défié les attentes placées en elle par les rôles de genre à l'époque et a commencé l'héritage de la préservation à Savannah.
124
Place Wright
Ici, nous discuterons de l'impact de deux personnages indigènes clés de l'histoire de Savannah : Tomochichi, chef et fondateur de la tribu indigène Yamacraw, et Coosaponakeesa (AKA Mary Musgrove), une femme Creek. Les deux ont joué un rôle aussi déterminant dans la formation de Savannah qu'Oglethorpe qui est considéré comme le fondateur.
125
Lieu de naissance de Juliette Gordon Low
Ici, nous discuterons de Juliette Gordon Low, la fondatrice des éclaireuses, ainsi que d'autres membres féminins non conventionnels de la famille, et de leur impact sur les rôles que les femmes joueront à l'avenir, et nous aborderons également la perte auditive de Julliette.
126
Place Chippewa
Ici, nous allons brièvement discuter du site d'origine de l'église catholique de Savannah, fondée par la communauté haïtienne évoquée précédemment. Nous discutons également de Susie King Taylor, une femme auto-libérée qui a servi comme infirmière et enseignante pendant la guerre civile, a publié des mémoires et a ouvert une école pour enfants noirs juste à côté de Chippewa Square.
127
Madison Square
Ici, nous nous arrêterons devant la maison Green-Meldrim et discuterons de l'ordre de terrain 15, tel qu'émis par le général Sherman mais formé et négocié par un groupe de 20 pasteurs noirs et dirigeants communautaires dirigés par Garrison Frazier, comment c'était la naissance de la réparation pratique efforts déployés et pourquoi sa mise en œuvre a été empêchée.
128
Place de Monterey
Ici, nous parlerons de Jim Williams, célèbre de Minuit dans le jardin du bien et du mal, mais un homosexuel de premier plan de Savannah qui a également lancé tout le mouvement de restauration de Savannah. Nous verrons également le monument du comte Casimir Pulaski et discuterons de son impact sur la Révolution et de la découverte récente qu'il était probablement une personne intersexuée.
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Commentaires (42)
Lindsey_B
Dec 2022
This was a fantastic tour. Sargon was a wonderful guide and was so good at bringing the historical people and places to life. I learned so much history I didn't know about before. Highly recommend for anyone visiting Savannah!
Adriano_C
Nov 2022
Sargon was super friendly and knowledgeable about Savannah. Despite the downpour, Sargon completed the tour and answered all the questions that we had. Great experience and would highly recommend it for anyone who is a interested to learn more about the lesson-known parts of the city’s history. Thank you Sargon!
Nacirema7
Sep 2022
This tour was incredible. As an aficionado of lesser-told history, Sargon's guided explanations were insightful and informative. They did an excellent job providing as much context to the stories, while also keeping the information entertaining and concise. There is so much I learned on this tour that I would love to share, but if you are considering this tour you are much better off having them tell you instead!

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